Top 15 Book-to-Movie Adaptations

Top 15 Book-to-Movie Adaptations

I agree with Buzzfeed when it picked “To Kill a Mockingbird" as the best book-to-movie adaptation of all time. Buzzfeed listed the top 23 adaptations based on their readers’ favorites. Those who “voted” for the movies that made the list were not necessarily comparing them with the novels.

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Hollywood’s Love Affair with Lady Liberty: From “Saboteur” to “Adjustment Bureau”

Hollywood’s Love Affair with Lady Liberty: From “Saboteur” to “Adjustment Bureau”

From the 1942 Alfred Hitchcock film, “Saboteur,” to the Matt Damon-starrer “The Adjustment Bureau” (2011), Lady Liberty has been thrilling, scaring, and entertaining moviegoers over the years.

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5 Reasons Why Writers Should Watch Federico Fellini’s “La Dolce Vita”

5 Reasons Why Writers Should Watch Federico Fellini’s “La Dolce Vita”

A quick Google search will show you that “La Dolce Vita,” which means “the sweet life,” is a popular name for Italian restaurants, bakeries, and coffee shops. The term has taken on a life of its own ever since Federico Fellini’s film of the same title was released in 1960.

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“The Savages”: A Small Film Showcasing the Giant Talent of Philip Seymour Hoffman

“The Savages”: A Small Film Showcasing the Giant Talent of Philip Seymour Hoffman

Like most film buffs, I was devastated when the news broke that Philip Seymour Hoffman died of accidental drug overdose on Feb. 2. He was 46. Described by the New York Times as “the most ambitious and the most widely admired American actor of his generation,” Hoffman was best known for “Capote” (2005), which earned him the Oscar for best actor.

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“Inside Llewyn Davis” Elevates “Starving Artist” Stereotype to a Darkly Funny Hero

“Inside Llewyn Davis” Elevates “Starving Artist” Stereotype to a Darkly Funny Hero

The film starts with Llewyn Davis (Oscar Isaac), a folk singer, performing in a club. It’s the 1960s in Greenwich Village in New York City. He sings hauntingly about being hanged, a foreboding of what’s to come. Indeed, after his performance, he gets beaten up by a stranger at the back of the club.

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5 Lessons for Writers from François Truffaut’s “The 400 Blows”

5 Lessons for Writers from François Truffaut’s “The 400 Blows”

rançois Truffaut’s “The 400 Blows” is a staple of film courses, the frontrunner in the French New Wave Cinema. Not surprisingly, I watched it in class when I was in college. Our analysis now escapes me, but I remember getting teary-eyed while watching it. The 12-year-old protagonist, Antoine Doinel (Jean-Pierre Léaud), is one of the most unforgettable characters ever created in film. He has stayed with me for decades.

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I Went to Florence Because of E.M. Forster

I Went to Florence Because of E.M. Forster

Is there a book that has made you do something you wouldn’t do otherwise? For me, it’s E.M. Forster’s A Room with a View. I went to Florence in 2013 because I promised myself I would—that was more than 20 years ago, when I first read the book and then watched the James Ivory movie of the same title.

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