In Praise of the "Short and Sweet": Top 9 Novellas

In Praise of the "Short and Sweet": Top 9 Novellas

It’s torrid outside. It’s time for a summer fling—make that a literary summer fling. I’m talking about reading something short and sweet: a novella. It’s longer and more satisfying than a short story, without the “commitment” required by a novel.

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In Praise of the Here and Now: Top 12 Present-Tense Novels

In Praise of the Here and Now: Top 12 Present-Tense Novels

“September. It seems these luminous days will never end.” This is how James Salter’s 1967 novel, “A Sport and a Pastime,” begins. The unnamed narrator is describing Paris—in the present tense. It made me pause because countless writing workshops, articles, and panel discussions tell us the same thing: don't write your novel in the present tense.

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Are You a Literary Snob? 6 Signs to Watch For

Are You a Literary Snob? 6 Signs to Watch For

Is reading literature a form of snobbery? Literature has always been associated with the upper class because traditionally only rich people have access to it. They are also more likely to have the education necessary to appreciate literature. But in this day and age of global communication, when you don’t have to be able to read or understand a single word of French to appreciate Proust, is it still snobbish to read “Remembrance of Things Past?”

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What Got Me Published Could Be the Very Thing You Need

What Got Me Published Could Be the Very Thing You Need

What does it take to be a traditionally published author? Twenty years ago, I would have said talent and connections. Today, on the occasion of the cover reveal for my literary debut, only one word comes to mind—grit. If your field is as cutthroat as publishing, here are four ways that helped me develop mental toughness, which could be the very thing you need.

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5 Reasons Why Reading is the Key to Writing Success

5 Reasons Why Reading is the Key to Writing Success

Want to be a writer? Read, read, and read some more. It’s the first requirement for writing well. Don’t take my word for it, take Stephen King’s. He said: “You have to read widely, constantly refining (and redefining) your own work as you do. If you don’t have the time to read, you don’t have the time (or the tools) to write.”

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